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Hot and spicy: the same thing?

The terms “hot” and “spicy” often get confused with each other. Especially when “hot” can mean hot in temperature and chilli pepper hot. To avoid that confusion, people will sometimes call any food that has a strong and pungent flavour “spicy”.
However, not all spices are hot. There are countless “mild” spices that are used to enhance the natural flavour of food, to make appetizing sauces and mixes, and to create new and exciting dishes.
Needless to say, most “hot” spices do come from hot countries. While “mild” seasoning and flavouring spices tend to come from countries with a mild climate.
Ultimately, though, whether you like your food hot or spicy is all a matter of taste.

The top-10 rarest most expensive spices in the world.

1) Saffron from Iran

2) Tahiti vanilla

3) Bourbon vanilla

4) Mastic, which is used to make sweet dishes, liqueurs, and ouzo

5) Tasmanian pepper, which is used to season fish

6) Piment d’Espelette, a type of chilli that grows in the Basque country

7) Tonka beans

8) Mace, made from the nutmeg plant fruit.

9) White cardamom

10) Cameroon pepper, a white pepper with a full flavour and a nutty tang